Speakers:



  • Peter Frykman   (GEUS, Denmark) [+]
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    Peter Frykman is a Senior Research Geologist in the Reservoir Geology Department at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland. He has a special interest in data integration and application of geo-modelling for use in flow simulation studies of CO2 storage sites. He has worked with reservoir characterisation at a wide range of scales and considers himself a Geo-Engineer. He holds a Ph.D. in carbonate sedimentology at the University of Copenhagen.

  • Nicolas Maurand   (IFPEN, France) [+]
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    Nicolas Maurand is graduated from Ecole Centrale de Nantes (2003) and IFP-school (2004). From 2004 to 2007, he was acting as petroleum engineer for Total Exploration and Production in several countries (Gabon, Nigeria, Kazakhstan). Since 2008, he is working in the reservoir engineering department for IFP Energies nouvelles and he is specialised in CO2 storage simulations coupled with geochemistry and geomechanics.
    He has been involved in several European CCS R&D projects (Dynamis, Geocapacity, Geonet, Ecco, Coach, Sitechar, UltimateCO2...), industrial R&D collaboration on CO2 storage modelling (Total, ENI, Petrobras, ...) and give lectures of reservoir multiphase flow simulations applied to CO2 in several courses (IFP-school, BRGM, EAGE).

  • Sigurdur Reynir Gislason   (University of Iceland) [+]
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    Sigurdur Reynir Gislason is a research professor at the University of Iceland's Institute of Earth Sciences, where he studies water/gas/rock and water/biomass interactions by field and laboratory experimental studies. He is the chairman of the Scientific Steering Committee for the carbon storage in basaltic rocks initiative; Carb-fix (carbfix.com).
    Gislason’s major scientific contributions are: 1) measurement of the dissolution rates and dissolution mechanisms of volcanic glasses, 2) field and laboratory experiments related to mineral storage of CO2 in basaltic rocks, 3) quantifying the chemical/physical erosion rates of basaltic terrains and their contribution to the global carbon cycle and 4) measuring the environmental effects of volcanic eruptions.

  • Jean-Pierre Deflandre   (IFPEN, France) [+]
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    Jean-Pierre Deflandre is Professor at IFP School (Centre for Exploration – Production) while being in charge of European R&D projects on CO2 geological storage at IFP Energies nouvelles. He had a 30-year experience in different R&D domains, being initially involved in enhanced oil recovery, rock mechanics and hydraulic fracture mapping laboratory studies. Then he worked at developing permanent downhole tools and software’s for passive seismic data acquisition, processing and interpretation. He has been involved on gas storage geomechanical survey since the early 90’s.
    Jean-Pierre is also an active member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers being the Chaiperson for France.

  • Gerco Hoedeman   (TNO, the Netherlands) [+]
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    Gerco Hoedeman has a MSc in Geology specialized in Earth Materials with a minor in Exploration Geology from the University of Utrecht. He works as a Geomechanist at the Petroleum Geosciences department at TNO on topics like the long-term sealing integrity of wells and caprock during CO2 storage, stability of salt caverns and hydraulic fracturing of (un)conventional and geothermal energy sources. Currently, he is also coordinator of the ULTimateCO2 workpackage on the long-term caprock sealing integrity.

  • Jeremy ROHMER   (BRGM, France) [+]
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    Jeremy ROHMER is graduated from the Paris School of Mines (2002) with a major in geotechnical sciences. He joined in 2005 the French geological survey (BRGM, Orleans), where he is mainly involved in coupled hydromechanical modelling with applications for geotechnical risk assessment in the field of post mining and CO2 geological storage. In 2008, he carried out the geomechanical study within the framework of the expert survey requested by the French authorities following the application by TOTAL for a CO2 storage pilot permit in Lacq (South West of France). In 2009, he managed a project funded by the BRGM’s Research Directorate and dedicated to investigating innovative corrective and remediation measures in case of “abnormal behaviour” of the CO2 geological storage site. Since 2012, he is managing the four-year ANR-FISIC project (funded by the French national agency for research ANR) aiming at gaining a better understanding of fault zone behavior under chemo- mechanical perturbations.

  • Stefan Lüth   (GFZ, Germany) [+]
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    Stefan Lüth is graduated in Geophysics at the Clausthal University of Technology (Diploma) and subsequently earned his PhD in Sciences at the Free University of Berlin (Germany). After a few years coonducting research in active and passive seismology with special focus on the Chilean subduction zone he joined the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. He coordinated several projects collaborating with academic and commercial partners in the field of application of Geophysics in geotechnical projects. He is now head of the Ketzin seismic monitoring group at the GFZ.

  • Philippe Pezard   (CNRS, France) [+]
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    Philippe Pezard is graduated in Engineering sciences from ESIM (1980), PhD from Columbia University, NY (1990), teaching researcher at IMT in Marseilles (1990-1993). He created the Borehole Geo-physics and Hydro-dynamics Laboratory (LGHF,1992). He was the Chairman of ODP Committee in France (2001-2005) and the coordinator for the “ALIANCE” Project (EKV-2001-00039, 2002-2005) on the subject of hydrogeophysics survey on salt water intrustions in coastal areas. Working at CNRS since 1994 where he is now Head of Research (Geo-sciences, Montpellier).

  • Jens Birkholzer   (LBNL, USA) [+]
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    Jens Birkholzer is a staff scientist in the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), where he currently leads the Nuclear Energy & Waste Program. Jens received his Ph.D. in water resources, hydrology, and soil science from Aachen University of Technology in Germany in 1994. Jens has over 230 scientific publications, about 60 of which are in peer-reviewed journals, in addition to numerous laboratory and research reports. Jens area of expertise is subsurface hydrology with emphasis on coupled fluid, gas, solute and heat transport in complex subsurface systems. His research is mostly in the context of modeling and data evaluation related to risk/performance assessment, e.g., for geologic disposal of radioactive wastes, for geologic CO2 storage, and for environmental remediation. In the area of radioactive waste disposal, he has focused on understanding temperature-driven flow and transport processes within and near waste emplacement tunnels, via experiments and predictive modeling. In the area of CO2 storage, Jens works on better understanding the potential environmental risks of geologic carbon seques¬tration to groundwater resources, for example by monitoring and modeling the potential water quality changes arising from leakage of CO2 through fractures and faults into potable aquifers.

  • Jesús Carrera   (CSIC, Spain) [+]
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    Jesús Carrera (Vigo, Spain, 1957) is “Research Professor” at the “Jaume Almera” Institute for Earth Sciences (CSIC, Spanish Council for Scientific Research). He works on groundwater modeling with emphasis on the inverse problem, reactive transport and the study of heterogeneity. In addition to MUSTANG and PANACEA, he collaborates with CIUDEN in the planning and design of CO2 injection tests at Hontomin.

  • Philippe Gouze   (CNRS, France) [+]
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    Philippe Gouze has a PhD in quantitative hydrology, 1993, from the University of Paris Pierre et Maris Curie, France. He was research associate at Water Resource Systems Research Unit, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, England, 1993-1994. Since 1995, he is full time researcher at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and presently Head of the Transport in Porous Media group (29 peoples) part of the Geosciences Research Unit, Montpellier University. His researches focus on groundwater and reservoirs modeling with emphasis on reactive transport from laboratory scale to field scale.

  • Chris McDermott   (UEDIN, UK) [+]
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    Christopher has trained and worked as a hydrogeologist, an engineering geologist and an applied geoscience numerical modeller. His focus is on the numerical and experimental investigation of applied engineering coupled process problems and the development of new experimental and numerical approaches to the predictive modelling of these processes. His work spans fundamental research investigation to practical engineering questions and application of geoscience research at a regulatory advice level.

  • Dr. Ton Wildenborg   (TNO, The Netherlands) [+]
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    Dr Ton Wildenborg is a senior geoscientist and project manager at TNO, who has over 20 years of experience in projects dealing with waste management, CO2 storage, performing risk assessment in CO2 storage projects and developing regulations for CO2 storage. He received his Master’s Degree in Earth Sciences at Utrecht University in 1982. In the same year he started a PhD research project which was successfully defended in 1990. He was manager of the recently finalized EU project CO2ReMoVe, which developed the technological basis for monitoring and verification of CO2 storage and provided recommendations for implementing regulation for CO2 storage.

  • Thomas Le Guenan   (BRGM, France) [+]
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    Thomas Le Guenan joined BRGM in January 2008 to work on safety issues for geologic storage of CO2 under the Risks and CO2 storage Safety department. He is now manager of the safety criteria and impacts of CO2 storage program, which comprises around 20 BRGM projects on the subject. He holds a multidisciplinary masterlevel degree from the Ecole Centrale Paris, a French non-specialized engineering school, and a Master of Science degree in environmental and land planning engineering from the Politecnico di Milano University. His areas of interests are both in the methodological aspects, such as risk management method or decision-making tools, and in the understanding of phenomena: leakages, pressures build-up, etc.

  • Thomas Kempka   (GFZ Germany) [+]
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    Thomas studied waste management engineering at the RWTH Aachen in Germany, did his Ph.D. at the Department of Engineering Geology and Hydrogeology (RWTH Aachen) and spent his post-doc time there, too. In 2009 Thomas started working at the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences in Potsdam, Germany, where he was employed as a principal research scientist responsible for the process modelling group at the Centre for CO2 Storage (Mainly working on Ketzin reservoir simulations and coupled processes, but also doing numerical simulations for other study areas in different national and international projects). Since October 2012, Thomas is the deputy head of the Hydrogeology Section at GFZ and mainly dedicated to coupled fluid flow and geomechanical numerical processes and simulations.